Monmouth's Rebellion

After the death of Charles II in 1685, his popular but illegitimate Protestant son, the Duke of Monmouth, raised a rebellion against his Catholic uncle James II that failed and led to Monmouth's capture near the New Forest, his execution, and the 'Bloody Assizes' which included the trial of a well-known Forest lady, Alice Lisle. (See Alice Lisle). A further connection between the New Forest and Monmouth is the fact that Monmouth's descendant, Lord Montagu, owns Beaulieu Abbey there. (See Beaulieu Abbey)




 

 

 

Did You Know?
In 1598, Queen Elizabeth ordered a banquet featuring a food source from the new world: potatoes. The royal cooks, having never prepared potatoes before, threw the veggie away and cooked the green part or eye instead, sickening the whole royal court. Elizabeth banned the vegetable. The ban was eventually lifted a few years later when potatoes gained popularity in Spain, France and Italy.




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