Rutherfurd on Rutherfurd


Q. But then you were unexpectedly offered a job.

A. My tutor at Cambridge had heard about a job in political research and recommended me without my knowledge. Suddenly, stuck in the middle of Chapter Seven, I get a letter asking me to an interview.

Q. And they offered you a job. Had you taken an interest in politics before?

A. Not really. But it took me right into the centre of the political system. A wonderful opportunity. So I figured I'd try it, and work on the book at week-ends.

Q. You did two research jobs in fact, for different parties. Was it interesting?

A. Very. Some of the people I worked with were planning to go into politics, or political journalism. It gave one a big insight into the process.

Q. But you didn't think of a political life for yourself?

A. Maybe once or twice. But most of the time, though the work itself was fascinating, I kept thinking: "This would make a good story", or "there's a character for a novel some day." I couldn't help it.

Q. You kept writing?

A. Some articles for The Spectator magazine. Another novel, taken to an agent but not accepted.







Did You Know?
The phrase "Mad as a March Hare" was popularized by Lewis Carrol in his classic, Alice in Wonderland, in which the March Hare is a character. The phrase was coined because hares are supposed to behave strangely during the March mating season.

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